How can you improve the IAQ around you?
Now that you have an understanding about the air that you’re breathing, you can take can control and improve your IAQ.
Here are some preventatives that you can do to minimize your health risk:

  If using products that have high fume make sure there is proper ventilation. Outdoor air can dilute the chemical level.
  No smoking indoors or near windows or doors. Tobacco smoke gets absorbed by furniture, carpets, curtains, etc. and takes a long time to be desorbed.
  Chimney needs to be cleaned and clear of obstructions.
  Don’t idle vehicles or gas powered equipment indoor (eg. garage) or near windows or doors.
  For building & household products, use “green” or “environmentally friendly” options.
  If possible, wash and air out products (eg. drapes, clothing, sheets) containing any VOC before bringing indoor.
  Buy limited quantities to avoid having leftovers for storage.
  Safely dispose partially full containers of old or unneeded chemicals.
  Prevent moisture build-up inside and make sure water leaks are cleaned up rapidly.
  Keep humidity levels below 60% (Aerias) by purchasing a dehumidifier. High humidity encourages off gassing.
  Read labels and use as directed.


Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing


REFERENCES:

Aerias. “VOCs: A Major Contributor to Indoor Pollution”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.aerias.org/DesktopModules/ArticleDetail.aspx?articleId=131.

Berglund, et al. (1997). “Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC) in Indoor Air quality Investigations”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.inive.org/medias/ECA/ECA_Report19.pdf.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). “NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/default.html.

Environment Canada. (2010). “Clean Air Online”. Retrieved June 7, 2010 from http://www.ec.gc.ca/cas-aqhi/default.asp?Lang=En.

Gilbert, Nicolas. (2005). “Proposed residential indoor air quality guidelines for formaldehyde”. Retrieved June 3, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/air/formaldehyde/in-formaldehyde-eng.pdf.

Health Canada. (2006). “Residential Indoor Air Quality Guideline: Formaldehyde”. Retrieved June 4, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/air/formaldehyde-eng.pdf.

Health Canada. (2009a). “Formaldehyde - Pollutants from Household Products and Building Materials”. Retrieved June 3, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/air/in/poll/construction/formaldehyde-eng.php.

Health Canada. (2009b). “It's Your Health: Formaldehyde and Indoor Air”. Retrieved June 4, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/alt_formats/pacrb-dgapcr/pdf/iyh-vsv/environ/formaldehyde-eng.pdf.

US Environmental Protection Agency. (1991). “Indoor Air Fact Sheet No. 4 (revised) – Sick Building Syndrome”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/sbs.html.

US Environmental Protection Agency. (1994). “Indoor Air Pollution: An Introduction for Health Professionals”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/hpguide.html.

US Environmental Protection Agency. (2010). “An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/voc.html.

World Health Organization. (1989). “International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): Environmental Health Criteria 89: Formaldehyde”. Retrieved June 2, 2010 from http://www.inchem.org/documents/ehc/ehc/ehc89.htm.