Tag Archive | "YES Plus LGA"

FREE AIHce 2013 Guest Pass


Be our guest at this year’s American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Expo (AIHce) 2013 show in Montreal, Quebec at the Palais Des Congres De Montreal. Print off your FREE guest pass and come visit us at booth #705 between May 20 – 22, 2013.

The American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Expo is the “must attend” event for thousands of industrial hygiene and occupational and environmental health and safety professionals. Come and see why professionals have to come to rely on AIHce as their source for professional development and networking for over 70 years. Engaging general sessions, innovative technical sessions, comprehensive professional development courses and a bustling Expo.

We love this show because it gives us the opportunity to meet our clients face-to-face, shake their hands and thank them personally for their business. This year we’d love the opportunity to meet up with you.

Whether you get tickets from us or on your own, please make plans to visit us at the show. Ron Sweet, Eastern Regional Sales Manager, and Frank Britton, General Manager, would love to have the opportunity to express our gratitude and assist you with any questions.

For more info about the AIHce show, visit aihce2013.org.

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FREE AIHce 2012 Guest Pass


Be our guest at this year’s American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Expo (AIHce) 2012 show in Indianapolis, Indiana at the Indiana Convention Center. Print off your FREE guest pass and come visit us at booth #531 between June 18 – 20, 2012.

The American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Expo is the “must attend” event for thousands of industrial hygiene and occupational and environmental health and safety professionals. Come and see why professionals have to come to rely on AIHce as their source for professional development and networking for over 70 years. Engaging general sessions, innovative technical sessions, comprehensive professional development courses and a bustling Expo.

We love this show because it gives us the opportunity to meet our clients face-to-face, shake their hands and thank them personally for their business. This year we’d love the opportunity to meet up with you.

Whether you get tickets from us or on your own, please make plans to visit us at the show. Mirza Baig, Western Regional Sales Manager, and Frank Britton, General Manager, would love to have the opportunity to express our gratitude and assist you with any questions.

For more info about the AIHce show, visit aihce2011.org.

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CETCI Simultaneously Identifies the Air You’re Breathing with YESAIR & YES Plus LGA


Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc. (CETCI) is a known industry leader and innovator for the indoor air quality (IAQ) market. Their two best selling portable IAQ instruments are the YESAIR and YES Plus LGA.

Both IAQ instruments are portable, multi-channel monitors featuring thirty different internal plug and play sensors to select from and a remote particulate sensor that simultaneously monitors within a single, easy to carry instrument. CETCI’s plug & play sensor options are the widest selection on the market and include electrochemical (carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, chlorine dioxide, formaldehyde, arsine, fluorine, hydrazine, phosphine, silane, and many more), catalytic (combustible gases), infrared (CO2 or combustible gases), and PID (TVOC). Users can set one alarm level for each gas to activate the internal audible alarm. Both instruments have a built-in SD flash card for data logging and an internal sample pump for “active sampling”. The LCD display, on both, indicates each sensor type installed, measured values for each gas, battery status, and more.

YESAIR has been on the market since 2006. Even today, it still offers more features, flexibility and functionality than any other instrument on the market. YESAIR is CE certified and has a seven-sensor capacity with up to five internal plug & play sensors, a fixed temperature sensor, and a fixed relative humidity (RH) sensor. The LCD displays all the installed sensors simultaneously and can operate 12-14 hours with a NiMH battery pack or continuously with a wall adapter. The instrument is enclosed in a rugged ABS/polycarbonate enclosure and can either be a handheld, stand on a flat surface, or fastened to a wall for permanent or semi-permanent use. With only three tactile push buttons makes the YESAIR simple to use. Optional features include internet and network accessible.

YES Plus LGA was recently introduced to the market earlier this year as an upgrade from the original YES Plus. This single solution, multi-sensor IAQ and landfill surface gas emissions monitor is pending CE certifications. It features four tactile push buttons for easy use and a fifteen sensor capacity with up to twelve internal plug & play sensors, a fixed temperature sensor, a RH sensor, and a remote sensor. The LCD displays up to six installed sensors at one time and scrolls to display more. It can operate 18-24 hours with a NiMH battery pack or continuously with a wall adapter. YES Plus LGA is housed in a rugged ABS enclosure and has an aluminum swivel handle that acts as a handheld or stand support.

The Landfill Gas Analyzer (LGA) version has an optional plug-in GPS and Bluetooth module and a firmware version that’s suitable for landfill surveys to communicate to pocket PDAs. The internal sample pump has an automatic flow control that ensures 1-LPM flow rate even with resistance. This version will be available later this fall.

CETCI will continue to develop and expand their portable IAQ product line to meet the needs of the market. For more information on the entire range of IAQ instruments and gas detection systems, please visit www.critical-environment.com.

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Know the Air You’re Breathing: How can you improve the IAQ around you? (4 of 4)


How can you improve the IAQ around you?

Now that you have an understanding about the air that you’re breathing, you can take can control and improve your IAQ.

Here are some preventatives that you can do to minimize your health risk:

If using products that have high fume make sure there is proper ventilation. Outdoor air can dilute the chemical level.
No smoking indoors or near windows or doors. Tobacco smoke gets absorbed by furniture, carpets, curtains, etc. and takes a long time to be desorbed.
Chimney needs to be cleaned and clear of obstructions.
Don’t idle vehicles or gas powered equipment indoor (eg. garage) or near windows or doors.
For building & household products, use “green” or “environmentally friendly” options.
If possible, wash and air out products (eg. drapes, clothing, sheets) containing any VOC before bringing indoor.
Buy limited quantities to avoid having leftovers for storage.
Safely dispose partially full containers of old or unneeded chemicals.
Prevent moisture build-up inside and make sure water leaks are cleaned up rapidly.
Keep humidity levels below 60% (Aerias) by purchasing a dehumidifier. High humidity encourages off gassing.
Read labels and use as directed.

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

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REFERENCES:

Aerias. “VOCs: A Major Contributor to Indoor Pollution”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.aerias.org/DesktopModules/ArticleDetail.aspx?articleId=131.

Berglund, et al. (1997). “Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC) in Indoor Air quality Investigations”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.inive.org/medias/ECA/ECA_Report19.pdf.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). “NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/default.html.

Environment Canada. (2010). “Clean Air Online”. Retrieved June 7, 2010 from http://www.ec.gc.ca/cas-aqhi/default.asp?Lang=En.

Gilbert, Nicolas. (2005). “Proposed residential indoor air quality guidelines for formaldehyde”. Retrieved June 3, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/air/formaldehyde/in-formaldehyde-eng.pdf.

Health Canada. (2006). “Residential Indoor Air Quality Guideline: Formaldehyde”. Retrieved June 4, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/alt_formats/hecs-sesc/pdf/pubs/air/formaldehyde-eng.pdf.

Health Canada. (2009a). “Formaldehyde – Pollutants from Household Products and Building Materials”. Retrieved June 3, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/air/in/poll/construction/formaldehyde-eng.php.

Health Canada. (2009b). “It’s Your Health: Formaldehyde and Indoor Air”. Retrieved June 4, 2010 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/alt_formats/pacrb-dgapcr/pdf/iyh-vsv/environ/formaldehyde-eng.pdf.

US Environmental Protection Agency. (1991). “Indoor Air Fact Sheet No. 4 (revised) – Sick Building Syndrome”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/sbs.html.

US Environmental Protection Agency. (1994). “Indoor Air Pollution: An Introduction for Health Professionals”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/hpguide.html.

US Environmental Protection Agency. (2010). “An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)”. Retrieved June 8, 2010 from http://www.epa.gov/iaq/voc.html.

World Health Organization. (1989). “International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): Environmental Health Criteria 89: Formaldehyde”. Retrieved June 2, 2010 from http://www.inchem.org/documents/ehc/ehc/ehc89.htm.

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Know the Air You’re Breathing: Sick Building Syndrome/Building Related Illness & PID Sensors (3 of 4)


Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) and
Building Related Illness (BRI)

Long term exposure to VOC contributes to SBS and BRI. Based on the US Environmental Protection Agency (1991), SBS and BRI are compared in Table 3 below:

Table 3: Comparison between SBS & BRI

Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) Building Related Illness (BRI)
Definition An illness temporarily associated with an occupant’s presence in a building caused by indoor air pollutants. A diagnosable illness caused by an identified agent in the indoor air.
Symptoms Headaches
Eye, nose, throat irritation
Dry cough
Dry or itchy skin
Dizziness
Nausea
Fatigue
Cough
Chest tightness
Fever
Chills
Muscle aches
Cause Unknown Identified
Symptom after leaving building Relief Require prolong recovery time

 

Photo-ionization Detector (PID)
A PID is commonly used to measure TVOC mainly because it is the most efficient on the market. It provides instant and continuous readings to the user. However, if there’s a rapid temperature change or humidity level is high, the reading maybe affected.

PID is great for indicating the presence of VOC but it doesn’t identify the exact type of VOC. If a TVOC reading is 200 µg/m3 and increased to 300 µg/m3 the next month, it’s impossible to say the increase was due to formaldehyde. It’s also impossible to identify what combination of VOC made up the TVOC reading.

Ideally, measuring the exact type of VOC and monitoring it is a better practice. Unfortunately, this is not the case due to very high cost and convenience. In the short term, having one instrument to provide a TVOC reading as well as other sensors is less expensive and easier for the technician than to have to carry multiple units for each type of chemical. However, in the long term, if a high reading was detected, it will cost more to solve the problem since the type of VOC needs to be identified before a solution gets established. The technician would need to make a lot of assumptions and do a lot of trial and error runs which could take forever or a more simple method would be to analyze the air samples. Depending on the seriousness of the situation, other costs that get lumped into the problem are evacuation of the occupants, specific VOC detector(s) needs to be purchased, delays of other projects, and the time of all the individuals involved.

Common buildings that should monitor their IAQ include:

  • Hospitals
  • Scientific facilities eg. laboratories
  • School
  • Commercial buildings
  • Warehouses
  • Industrial buildings
  • Parkades
  • Repair shops
  • Food plants
  • Salons & spas
  • Manufacturing Plants
  • Medical Offices
  • Construction sites
  • Transportation facilities
  • And many more…

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing


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Know the Air You’re Breathing: Volatile Organic Compound (2 of 4)


Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)
Chemicals that emit gas are called VOC. Another common term, Total VOC (TVOC) is a combined variety of organic chemicals that emit gas. They are measured in micrograms per meter cubed (µg/m3) of air, parts per million (ppm), or parts per billion (ppb). Most buildings will have TVOC levels ranging from 100-500 µg/m3 (Aerias). Table 1, below, is used as a guide to compare TVOC results with its symptoms.

Table 1: TVOC and Symptoms

TVOC Symptoms
< 200 µg/m3 No irritation or discomfort expected
200 – 3,000 µg/m3 Irritation and discomfort may be possible
3,000 – 25,000 µg/m3 Discomfort expected and headache possible
> 25,000 µg/m3 Toxic range where other neurotoxic effects may occur

Source from Aerias

Concentrations of many VOC are consistently (up to ten times) higher indoors than outdoors (US Environmental Protection Agency, 2010). Therefore, some VOC are regulated due to its short and long term affects on the health of humans. For example, the most common VOC is formaldehyde. On average, formaldehyde levels measured over a day in Canadian homes were 20-40 μg/m3 (16-32.5 ppb). Daily levels as high as 95 μg/m3 (77 ppb), however, have been recorded (Health Canada, 2009b). This chemical is strictly regulated by the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) as it has been known to cause cancer. Table 2, below, lists a few common VOC along with the recommended exposure limit (REL) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), permissible exposure limit (PEL) of OSHA, identified symptoms if exposed to the chemical and some examples of products that contain the chemical.

Table 2: Common VOC

Chemical Exposure Limit Symptoms A Few Examples
Acetone
C3H6O
NIOSH REL:
TWA 250 ppm (590 mg/m3)

OSHA PEL:
TWA 1000 ppm (2400 mg/m3)

Eyes/nose/throat irritation
Headache
Dizziness
Central nervous system depression
Nail polish remover
Paint thinners
Sanitary cleaner
Arsine
AsH3
NIOSH REL:
0.002 mg/m3 [15-min]

OSHA PEL:
TWA 0.05 ppm (0.2 mg/m3)

Headache
Malaise
Lassitude
Dizziness
Dyspnea
Nausea
Vomiting

Lung & lymphatic cancer

Semi-conducting materials
Chemical warfare
Benzene
C6H6
NIOSH REL:
TWA 0.1 ppm ST 1 ppm

OSHA PEL:
TWA 1 ppm ST 5 ppm

Eyes/nose/throat irritation
Dizziness
Headache
Nausea
Anorexia
Lassitude

Leukemia

Tobacco smoke
Stored fuel
Paint supplies
Auto emission
Laboratory solvent
Formaldehyde
CH2O
NIOSH REL:
TWA 0.016 ppm

OSHA PEL:
TWA 0.75 ppm ST 2 ppm

Eyes/nose/throat irritation
Coughing
Wheezing

Nasal cancer

Carpet
Pill capsules
Disinfectant
Preservative in vaccines
Pressed wood
Hydrogen Sulfide
H2S
NIOSH REL:
10 ppm (15 mg/m3) [10-min]

OSHA PEL:
20 ppm – 50 ppm [10-min max peak]

Eyes/nose/throat irritation
Coma
Conjunctivitis
Dizziness
Headache
Lassitude
Irritability
Insomnia
Crude petroleum
Natural gas
Hot springs
Volcanoes
Nitric Oxide
NO
NIOSH REL:
TWA 25 ppm (30 mg/m3)

OSHA PEL:
TWA 25 ppm (30 mg/m3)

Unconsciousness
Eye irritation
Drowsiness
Wet skin/nose/throat
Tobacco smoke
Vehicle exhaust
Vaccines
Phosphine
PH3
NIOSH REL:
TWA 0.3 ppm (0.4 mg/m3) ST 1 ppm (1 mg/m3)

OSHA PEL:
TWA 0.3 ppm (0.4 mg/m3)

Nausea
Vomiting
Abdominal pain
Diarrhea
Chest tightness
Dyspnea
Pulmonary edema
Clothing
Microelectronics
Pesticide
Styrene NIOSH REL:
TWA 50 ppm (215 mg/m3) ST 100 ppm (425 mg/m3)

OSHA PEL:
TWA 100 ppm C 200 ppm 600 ppm (5-min max peak in any 3 hrs)

Eyes/nose irritation
Headache
Lassitude
Dizziness
Confusion
Malaise
Drowsiness
Narcosis
Reproductive effects
Synthetic rubber
Insulation
Fiberglass
Pipes
Auto and boat parts
Food containers
Carpet backing
Toluene
C7H8
NIOSH REL:
TWA 100 ppm (375 mg/m3) ST 150 ppm (560 mg/m3)

OSHA PEL:
TWA 200 ppm C 300 ppm 500 ppm (10-min max peak)

Eyes/nose irritation
Lassitude
Confusion
Euphoria
Muscle fatigue
Insomnia
Paresthesia
Dermatitis
Liver/kidney damage
Feedstock
Paint solvents
Gasoline
Silicone sealants
Printing ink
Adhesives
Disinfectants
Xylene
C6H4C2H6
NIOSH REL:
TWA 100 ppm (435 mg/m3) ST 150 ppm (655 mg/m3)

OSHA PEL:
TWA 100 ppm (435 mg/m3)

Eyes/nose/throat/skin irritation
Dizziness
Drowsiness
Corneal vacuolization
Anorexia
Vomiting
Abdominal pain
Dermatitis
Plastic bottles
Polyester clothing
Cleaning agents
Paint thinner
Paints & varnishes
Gasoline
Concrete sealers

TWA = Time Weighted Average

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

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  • We are celebrating 19 years in business today! THANK YOU to all our customers for helping us accomplish this milestone.,
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Gas Detectors

CETCI gas detectors are used to detect many different gases. Some of the most common are Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Nitric Oxide, Ammonia, Chlorine, Ozone, Combustible Gases like Methane and Propane, Oxygen, Refrigerants and more.

IAQ Monitors

The YES Series of IAQ Monitors are essential for those responsible for conducting Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Investigations. These instruments are specifically designed to measure and record the quality of indoor air in offices, buildings, homes, schools, parking garages, ice rinks, etc.