Tag Archive | "Transmitters"

CETCI’s New 3D Printed Calibration Clip Leaves Both Your Hands Free!


At Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc, (CETCI), we strive to be innovative, cutting edge and creative in our endeavors to fulfill our customers’ needs. Our latest testament to this is our newly designed calibration clip (or ‘Cal Clip’ as it is called for short). It has been an exciting few months as we have gone through different designs, prototypes, various types of plastics and calibration testing.

Remember the last time you calibrated one of our gas detectors that had a splash guard? The blue or orange calibration adapter cup that you had to hold with one hand over the splash guard while trying to open the gas cylinder with the other, flow gas and keep the cup snug up against the device? And depending on the location of the detector, acrobatics may have been involved, right? Well, those days are gone!

Our engineers have designed a device that easily clips around the splash guard and remains in place by itself, freeing up BOTH your hands to do what they need to do. Perhaps even give a high five to a coworker!

before-now-cal-clip

 

The Cal Clip is made of light, durable ABS/polycarbonate plastic and comes in our signature blue company colour. It is specially designed to allow calibration gas into the sensor vent through a small barb hose fitting attached to standard or Teflon tubing. The barb hose fitting can accommodate two sizes of hose: 1/8” (3.175 mm) ID and 3/16” (4.762 mm) ID. While stored, the tubing can be left attached or removed from the Cal Clip as desired.

The Cal Clip fits around the circular, black splash guard that is factory installed at the time of order on any of our black enclosure gas detectors or self-contained controllers. With the hose barb fitting at the bottom, pointing towards you, simply place the inside edge of the Cal Clip next to the outer edge of the splash guard and gently flex open the top of the other side outwards until it slips and clips around the entire splash guard. To remove, gently open the clip at the top while pulling one of the hooked ends towards yourself and it will slip off. If you pull the device apart too aggressively, overstretching it, the circular formation of the Cal Clip may be compromised. Evidence of this results in whitish bars appearing on the blue plastic (like stretchmarks).

NOTE: Because the Cal Clip is designed to prevent entry or exit of air except via the hose barb fitting, it must be removed from the splash guard during normal operation or else the gas readings will not be accurate.

About Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc.

Critical Environment Technologies designs and manufacturers indoor air quality and fixed gas detection systems including self-contained systems, controllers and analog and digital transmitters. Applications include commercial HVAC, institutional, municipal and light industrial markets worldwide. Many of these applications are for vehicle exhaust, but areas of specialization include refrigeration applications, food processing plants, manufacturing plants, wastewater treatment plants, fisheries, wineries/breweries, pulp and paper mills, recreational facilities, bakeries, greenhouses, and many more.

For more information about our products, check out our website at www.critical-environment.com or to discuss a tailored gas detection solution for your application, contact us at 1-877-940-8741.

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Monitoring Ethylene (C2H4) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Ripening Rooms


Fruits and vegetables are commonly shipped for long distances from one country to another before they are ripe so they can endure the voyage and remain viable. Upon arrival at their destination, the first order of business is to get them ripe and ready for sale and consumption.

As fruit and vegetables ripen, they release ethylene, a naturally occurring growth hormone. To be profitable and meet demands, commercial fresh produce companies need to speed up the ripening process in a uniform and predictable way, which is achieved by adding more ethylene in a controlled environment. Typically the fresh produce is placed in air-tight ripening rooms and ethylene is introduced at concentrations between 10 and 1,000 ppm depending on the type of produce.

Ethylene is not harmful to humans in the concentrations used in ripening rooms. An extremely high level of ethylene would have to be inhaled in order to have an adverse effect on human health. That being said, ethylene is a very reactive and flammable gas, making the potential for an explosion a safety concern. The LEL for ethylene is 27,000 ppm (2.7%) and a common concentration used in a ripening room is 1,000 ppm (0.1% by volume), with a typical exposure time of 24 hours.

Two common ways to add ethylene to the ripening rooms is by high pressure gas cylinders or ethylene generators. If ethylene is delivered into the rooms by pipes from cylinders, there are areas for potential leaks and the threat of explosion from cylinders of pure ethylene is high. An ethylene gas detector would be highly recommended to continuously monitor the ethylene gas levels in the cylinder storage room.

In the ripening rooms, the primary reason for an ethylene gas detector is not for the safety of humans, but rather for the safety of the perishable goods. Assisted ripening is a complex process and predictions can be made about the remaining shelf life of the perishable goods based on the level of ethylene gas that is present; that the produce gives off. Some types of fruits and vegetables are more sensitive to ethylene than others. Ethylene sensitive produce will spoil if exposed to levels that make them ripen too quickly. Varieties that are more tolerant but don’t get the right amount will not ripen on schedule.

There is also the potential for ethylene to leak from one room into another, especially if the method of delivery is through a network of pipes. This could cause premature ripening or result in damage to the other types of produce in adjacent rooms. Monitoring the concentration levels of the ethylene gas in each room will help ensure the correct amount is being delivered at all times.

As fruit ripens, it releases carbon dioxide. This decreases the oxygen level in the room and delays the effects of the ethylene. CO2 levels in excess of 1% (10,000 ppm) will slow the ripening process, and can cause quality and production problems. When CO2 levels build up, the ripening room should be vented, which could be as simple as opening the door, or turning on a ventilation system. Constant monitoring of the CO2 levels inside the room with a gas detector that can be configured to activate the ventilation system at a predefined concentration would allow for more efficient control and optimization of the ripening process, a higher safety level and better production.

 

About Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc.

Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc. is a leading equipment manufacturer for commercial and industrial gas detection applications. We are dedicated to designing, developing and servicing hazardous gas detection systems for a wide range of applications that require monitoring of refrigerants, TVOCs, combustible and toxic gases. CETCI’s products are sold through a worldwide network of authorized distributors. Our knowledgeable Regional Sales Managers are experienced with many application scenarios, including commercial, institutional, municipal and light industrial markets worldwide. Areas of specialization include car parks, refrigeration plants, commercial swimming pools, water purification, including wastewater treatment facilities, ice arenas, wineries and breweries, schools and many more.

 

For suggestions on gas detection systems, indoor air quality monitors and calibration, please visit

www.critical-environment.com.

 

References

smartGAS Mikrosensorik GmbH. Web. Retrieved from

http://www.smartgas.eu/en/products/applications/foodstorage.html [accessed 30 September 2015]

CHEMAXX INC. “Ethylene Explosion – Banana Ripening.” (2006). Retrieved from

http://www.chemaxx.com/explosion17b.htm [accessed 30 September 2015]

Catalytic Generators LLC “All About Ripening.” (2015). Retrieved from

http://ripening-fruit.com/ingredients_for_proper_ripening [accessed 30 September 2015]

 

 

 

Posted in Applications, EducationalComments Off on Monitoring Ethylene (C2H4) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Ripening Rooms

Ammonia Vent Line Gas Detector


Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc. (CETCI) is pleased to introduce our Ammonia (NH3) vent line gas detector.

The LPT-A Vent Line Ammonia Transmitter (P/N: LPT-A-VLT-NH3-S) is designed to detect and alert operators of high concentrations of ammonia in vent lines of refrigeration systems caused by equipment failure or system over pressurization. Slow leaks of refrigerant can be costly over time and a dangerous situation could present itself if a high pressure release were to occur. Typically, normal vapour flow is handled by the ammonia compressor, but a vapour flow in excess of the compressor’s capacity will enter the vent stack and can cause a large amount of the gas to travel up the vent line and discharge. In addition, higher than normal concentrations of ammonia can be caused by faulty valves, damaged or worn equipment, contaminants and/or equipment failure or system overpressure. Without safety precautions in place, hazardous levels of ammonia from equipment failure or over pressurization could cause an explosion and seriously jeopardize the health of workers and people in the surrounding area.

The VLT provides continuous, real-time monitoring of the levels of ammonia in the relief vent line. It can be configured to alarm at a pre-determined set point (1.0% / 10,000 ppm is recommended) and send an analog signal to activate a remote strobe or horn, or communicate with a controller or PLC to activate or shut down equipment as required.

The catalytic NH3 sensor has a range of 0 to 3% volume (0 – 30,000 ppm) and is potted into a 2” pipe fitting protruding from the back of the enclosure which connects to a coupler that is used to secure the device to a mounting pipe. The VLT may be mounted on the vent relief stack above the pressure relief valve using the 3/4” cast steel coupler. Or it can be mounted outside on the relief header, 3 to 5 feet above the roof-line. Unless exposed to very high concentrations of ammonia for a prolonged period of time, the sensor should last 3+ years.

The circuitry is housed in a durable, copper coated, ABS/polycarbonate enclosure that is water / dust tight (drip proof) and corrosion resistant. The factory installed splash guard on the (unused) front vent protects the interior from water entering the enclosure. A water tight gland provides a water tight conduit entry for the cable.

The VLT is virtually maintenance free, but removal from the pipe extension will be required to access the sensor during calibration. Bump tests should be done monthly and a full calibration conducted yearly (unless a significant exposure incident occurs, after which additional bump tests and/or calibrations are required to ensure the device is working properly and the sensor has not been poisoned).

Vent line systems should always be treated with extreme caution and workers should assume a relief valve could release at any time. Take necessary safety precautions and follow industry standard practices when installing, servicing and calibrating the VLT.

 

About Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc.

Critical Environment Technologies designs and manufacturers indoor air quality and fixed gas detection systems including self-contained systems, controllers and transmitters (analog, digital and wireless). Applications include commercial HVAC, institutional, municipal and light industrial markets worldwide. Many of these applications are for vehicle exhaust, but areas of specialization include refrigeration, food processing plants, manufacturing plants, wastewater treatment plants, commercial swimming pools and many more.

For more information about our products, check out our website at www.critical-environment.com or to discuss a tailored gas detection solution for your application, contact us at 1-877-940-8741.

Posted in Products, TransmittersComments Off on Ammonia Vent Line Gas Detector

Monitoring Ozone (in the air) in Hatchery & Fish Farm Applications


Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc, (CETCI) offers strategic and reliable gas detection solutions for many applications, including ozone gas detection in the aquaculture industry.

Hatcheries, fish farms and such in the aquaculture industry require clean water to maintain a high survival rate while rearing aquatic animals. Contaminated water increases the risk of infection which in turn can compromise production. A common way to disinfect water is by generating ozone on-site with an ozone generator. Ozone is a powerful bactericide and viricide that decreases the risk of infection from water borne diseases which helps maintain a high survival rate, aerates the water and leaves no undesirable residues. However, ozone is highly toxic to humans and aquatic animals at very low levels. Standards set by OSHA allow a permissible exposure level of less than 0.1 mg/L on a time-weighted average for an 8 hour work period and a maximum single exposure level of 0.3 mg/L for less than a 10 minute duration.

For human safety, the ozone concentrations in the air should be monitored in the locations that could become contaminated with ozone. A typical ozone system for a hatchery operation has an ozone generator and three chambers. The ozone generator creates ozone which is then introduced into the first tank, the counter flow diffusion chamber. Here the oxidization of dissolved matter occurs. The first ozone gas detector should be installed in the ozone generator room to monitor for potential leaks around the ozone generator and piping structures. If the gas detector were to go into alarm, it can be configured to shut off the ozone generator, stopping the production of ozone. In addition, the ventilation and make-up air fans can be triggered to come on and go off at set intervals, including when the gas detector goes into alarm. The second chamber is the reaction or contact tank where the disinfection of the water and slow chemical reactions occur. Depending on the operation setup, the second chamber may be in the ozone generator room or in another room or general area. From the contact tank, the water gets sent to the third chamber which completes the slow reactions and the majority of the residual ozone decomposes. Any undissolved or residual ozone gas is collected and vented by way of the ozone destruction process which will destroy the ozone in the gas before releasing it into the atmosphere. A second ozone gas detector should be installed near the ozone destructor to monitor the exhaust air stream to ensure the ozone destructor is operating effectively.

CETCI’s LPT-A-O3 Ozone Gas Detector offers a fixed, continuous gas monitoring solution for hatcheries, fish farms and other aquaculture operations that use ozone to clean the water. Use as a standalone system, or combine up to four ozone gas detectors with our QCC Quad Channel Controller for larger applications. Each LPT-A-O3 transmitter features an audible alarm, LCD display with real time gas readings and a programmable relay to shut down the ozone generator. When combined with a QCC Controller, three more relays are available for triggering safety events such as switching on/off ventilation fans or make-up air fans and/or activating a remote strobe/horn. More value-added features available are two analog outputs, a data logger, manual equipment ON/OFF switch, top mounted strobe, remote strobe and horn combo and remote display module that offers the ability to view the gas level readings in a separate location from the controller and transmitters.

Ozone is a very reactive gas and can quickly corrode metals and damage plastic materials. There should be regular maintenance checks of pipe fittings, gaskets and seals all along the ozone injection system. In addition to a fixed gas detection system, it is also recommended that portable handheld monitors be used to do spot checks for leaks around piping and in poorly ventilated areas. If there is an equipment malfunction, or if tubing’s and fittings leak, or too much ozone is being produced, a properly installed ozone gas detector system will alarm and shut down the ozone generator before a dangerous environment is created and the health and safety of the workers is jeopardized.

 

About Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc.

Critical Environment Technologies designs and manufacturers indoor air quality and fixed gas detection systems including self-contained systems, controllers and transmitters (analog, digital and wireless). Applications include commercial HVAC, institutional, municipal and light industrial markets worldwide. Many of these applications are for vehicle exhaust, but areas of specialization include refrigeration, food processing plants, manufacturing plants, wastewater treatment plants, commercial swimming pools and many more.

For more information about our products, check out our website at www.critical-environment.com or to discuss a tailored gas detection solution for your application, contact us at 1-877-940-8741.

 

References

Eugster, Ulrich and Bruce Stanley “The Use of Ozone as a Disinfectant in Fish Hatcheries and Fish Farms.” Web.
   http://www.ozomax.com/pdf/article-seafood-hatchery.pdf [accessed 2 October 2015]
Gearheart, Michael and Steven Summerfelt “Ozone Safety in Aquaculture Systems.” Hatchery International (July/August 2007). Web.
  http://www.ozonesolutions.com/files/research/aquaculture_safety.pdf [accessed 2 October 2015]
Summerfelt, Steven T and John N. Hochheimer “Review of Ozone Processes and Applications As an Oxidizing Agent in Aquaculture.” The
  Progressive Fish-Culturist (1997) 59:94-105. Web. http://www.w-m-t.com/library/pdf/Summerfelt_paper_Review_of_Ozone.pdf [accessed 2
  October 2015]
WorkSafe BC “Ozone Safe Work Practices.” (2006) Web.
  http://www.worksafebc.com/publications/health_and_safety/by_topic/assets/pdf/ozone_bk47.pdf [accessed 2 October 2015]

 

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Four Channel Gas Detector for Wastewater Treatment Plants


Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc, (CETCI) offers strategic and reliable gas detection solutions for many applications, including wastewater treatment plants. Our QCC Quad Channel Controller, is an ideal fixed gas detection system for this type of application.

A wastewater treatment facility is a wet maze of rooms, pipes, pumps, wells, chambers, concrete tanks and settling basins. Each treatment stage the wastewater goes through involves hazardous gases that may be already present, are produced or are added to complete the process. To ensure the safety of the workers, equipment and the facility, every area presenting a gas hazard should be monitored, including the gas storage rooms, ozone generator room and any room that gas passes through. In the larger, open areas, a fixed gas detection system is suitable; in confined spaces that operators enter and where gas may be present, portable gas detectors are more appropriate.

The most common hazardous gases found in this type of facility are hydrogen sulphide, methane, ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine and oxygen deficiency. Some facilities may also use ozone, chlorine dioxide or sodium hypochlorite with the chlorine during the sanitization treatment process. Furthermore, sulphur dioxide is often used to de-chlorinate the water once the treatment process is complete.

CETCI’s QCC Quad Channel Controller offers a fixed, continuous gas monitoring solution with four gas channels, three programmable relays, a door mounted audible alarm and an optional BACnet RS-485 output signal for communicating with a building automation system. The four gas channels can be configured with any combination of analog or digital transmitters with the same or different types of gas sensors. For large applications, multiple QCC controllers can be networked together, each providing another four available gas channels and 3 relays. Other value added, optional features include 2 analog outputs with a data logger, manual equipment ON/OFF switch, top mounted strobe, remote strobe and horn combo and a remote display module that offers the ability to view the gas level readings in a separate location from the controller and transmitters.

The potential for physical damage to the gas detection equipment is high in this type of harsh, wet environment. CETCI’s equipment is constructed to withstand the unpredictable water levels and acidic or caustic conditions from gases like hydrogen sulphide and chlorine when it mixes with water.

 

About Critical Environment Technologies Canada Inc.

Critical Environment Technologies designs and manufacturers indoor air quality and fixed gas detection systems including self-contained systems, controllers and transmitters (analog, digital and wireless). Applications include commercial HVAC, institutional, municipal and light industrial markets worldwide. Many of these applications are for vehicle exhaust, but areas of specialization include refrigeration, food processing plants, manufacturing plants, wastewater treatment plants, commercial swimming pools and many more.

For more information about our products, check out our website at www.critical-environment.com or to discuss a tailored gas detection solution for your application, contact us at 1-877-940-8741.

Posted in Applications, Controllers, News, ProductsComments Off on Four Channel Gas Detector for Wastewater Treatment Plants

Multiple Gas Detectors – Should They all be Calibrated at the Same Time?


Depending on the number and placement of gas detectors in your facility, you might be looking at the task of calibrating them as never-ending. It is true, calibration can be time consuming, especially if it is a large area populated with multiple fixed location sensors with different gas types – some near the ceiling, others near the floor and still others somewhere in between. However, it is a task the needs to be done and dedicating the time to calibrating them all at once is the optimal and responsible course of action. Having some sensors calibrated and others not on a job site leaves room for inaccuracies and poses a potential danger to workers and the public.

How long it takes to calibrate all the sensors will depend on the experience and training level of the person doing the calibration, what type of equipment is used and the number of sensors in the facility. Trained technicians can calibrate up to two different types of gas sensors at one time, which saves labour time. Taking on that challenge is not recommended unless the technician has the equipment, training and experience. Calibrating one sensor at a time may take a little longer, but can be easier for the inexperienced service technician and the end result is still a correctly functioning gas detection system.

Monthly bump testing of sensors is recommended in particular for sensors that are monitoring for gases that pose a serious health and safety risk when they leak, such as Ammonia, Chlorine, and Ozone. A log book must be kept to detail date, time and confirm bump testing results. It benefits the user to bump test all gas sensors in their facility. When bump testing Ammonia, in particular, use only a concentration of span gas just higher than the low alarm set point. Ammonia sensors are consumable and their life span is often measured in “ppm hours”. Using a high concentration of NH3 span gas to bump test will shorten the life of an Ammonia sensor.

How do you know if you are getting a correct reading from the unit?

The only way to guarantee that an instrument will detect gas accurately and reliably is to test it with a known concentration of gas. Exposing the instrument to a known concentration of test gas will show whether the sensors respond accurately and whether the instrument alarms function correctly. Keeping a log and verifying the accuracy of readings on a daily basis for a trial period will reinforce your confidence that the unit is performing correctly.

 

For suggestions on gas detection systems, indoor air quality monitors and calibration, please visit

www.critical-environment.com.

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Archives

Gas Detectors

CETCI gas detectors are used to detect many different gases. Some of the most common are Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Nitric Oxide, Ammonia, Chlorine, Ozone, Combustible Gases like Methane and Propane, Oxygen, Refrigerants and more.

IAQ Monitors

The YES Series of IAQ Monitors are essential for those responsible for conducting Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Investigations. These instruments are specifically designed to measure and record the quality of indoor air in offices, buildings, homes, schools, parking garages, ice rinks, etc.