Tag Archive | "moisture"

Things to think about when it comes to an energy efficient home


Every where we turn people are conserving and reducing in order to save money and our homes are no exception.

Every day there is new methods and products that are introduced to the market for you to save on your energy bill. In the short term, these newly introduced products stop your house from losing heat. What you may not know is that, in the long term, these same products are causing you to keep all the chemicals that are being off gassed inside with you. This is no different than a gas chamber. The most common off gassed chemical is formaldehyde. It is a common indoor air pollutant and can be toxic, allergenic, and carcinogenic. Unlike a cereal box, the common everyday items, such as furniture, clothes, cosmetics, toys, building materials, etc., do not come with a complete list of ingredients or wares.

If an older home has not been looked at from an overall air treatment stand point, the owner could be encapsulating himself in an unhealthy environment. Here are some examples:

  • The CO2 levels could be getting to over 1,000 ppm with three or four people living in the same air for 10-12 hours with little or no air exchange.
  • That new desk in the basement office could be off gassing formaldehyde.
  • The cleaners used on the kitchen floor every week for months at a time could be emitting any type of VOC.
  • The humidity levels being raised from cooking could encourage off gassing.
  • Harmful adhesives used in producing insulations could be hiding in your walls and releasing formaldehyde gas.
  • The new coat of paint could be off gassing beneze, a VOC that causes carcinogen.

Only 188 air toxins out of 80,000 chemicals are registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and have been tested for harmful effects. In other words, only 2% of the chemicals are being identified and possibly regulated. Not only are these substances a problem but the bio-accumulation lingers and can be deadly.

What should you look for in a new home?

For a well designed, new house built for high efficiency and maximum energy conservation, there are four things to look for:

  1. It should have a 95% efficient furnace or better yet, a heat exchange system (heat pump) for heating.
  2. The walls and attic should meet the R-2000 standard rating. This is a voluntary standard that is certified by the Government of Canada to exceed building code requirements for energy efficiency, indoor air quality (IAQ), and environmental responsibility.
  3. All the windows and doors are double or triple glazed and has high R-value rating when closed. This value determines the effectiveness of the insulation.
  4. It has an air handler that exchanges the internal for external air at a defined rate using a heat recovery unit to reduce the loss of energy.

What should you do to your current home?

For an older, well maintained house, there are three things that you can do to save on your energy bill:

  1. When remodeling, add extra insulation into the wall but make sure that the insulation does not contain formaldehyde.
  2. Add insulation into the attic and seal off the attic entrance.
  3. Install new double or triple glazed windows as well as new doors with air tight seals.
  4. Place plants in the home. Plants are known to purify the air and remove 99.9% of toxins.

Written by: Richard Grant, CETCI’s Service Department Supervisor

Posted in Environment, Health, Indoor Air QualityComments (5)

Six Factors to Consider Prior to Choosing an Electronic Enclosure Pt. 6 of 6


Choosing the right enclosure maybe as important as selecting the right product. An electronic enclosure, also known as housing, helps protect the circuit board allowing it to function properly. Elements (e.g. water, wind, dust, dirt, heat, cold, humidity, and chemicals) in the surrounding environment could damage or deteriorate the product (see Figure 1).

For example, large temperature variations between the inside and outside of the enclosure can result in pressure differences that may create a vacuum and draw water through the fittings or component and gasket seals. Or when moist air reaches its dew point, it can no longer hold its form and forms moisture droplets being formed on any available surfaces. This is called condensation. When temperatures are below freezing, it will condense into frost. After time, corrosion occurs and causes electrical resistance, which in turn generates additional heat, product performance problems, rusting, increasing risk of circuit shorting out, and arcing and sparking incidences.

Here are six factors to think about before choosing an enclosure:

  • Environment
  • Application
  • Thermal management requirements
  • Enclosure performance standards
  • Material
  • Size

————————————————————————————————–

SIZE

When specifying, enclosure size needs to be considered. Some questions to think about are:

  • Where will the equipment be mounted?
  • Does your application have specific enclosure location requirements?

It is essential to look at all six determinants – environment, application, thermal management requirements, enclosure performance standards, material, and size – prior to choosing an enclosure. Understanding all six factors will help you make a better choice when it comes to choosing the correct enclosure for the job. In essence, it will promote safety, define minimum levels of product performance, and minimize future maintenance expenses.

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

Posted in Enclosures, ProductsComments (7)

Six Factors to Consider Prior to Choosing an Electronic Enclosure Pt. 5 of 6


Choosing the right enclosure maybe as important as selecting the right product. An electronic enclosure, also known as housing, helps protect the circuit board allowing it to function properly. Elements (e.g. water, wind, dust, dirt, heat, cold, humidity, and chemicals) in the surrounding environment could damage or deteriorate the product (see Figure 1).

For example, large temperature variations between the inside and outside of the enclosure can result in pressure differences that may create a vacuum and draw water through the fittings or component and gasket seals. Or when moist air reaches its dew point, it can no longer hold its form and forms moisture droplets being formed on any available surfaces. This is called condensation. When temperatures are below freezing, it will condense into frost. After time, corrosion occurs and causes electrical resistance, which in turn generates additional heat, product performance problems, rusting, increasing risk of circuit shorting out, and arcing and sparking incidences.

Here are six factors to think about before choosing an enclosure:

  • Environment
  • Application
  • Thermal management requirements
  • Enclosure performance standards
  • Material
  • Size

————————————————————————————————–

MATERIAL

Deciding on the appropriate material for the enclosure, potential environmental threats and application location should be considered. Enclosures are constructed of metals (eg. aluminum, steel) or non-metallic materials (eg. plastic, fiberglass), depending on application performance requirements as seen in Table 4. Table 5 describes the advantages and disadvantages of each enclosure material.

Table 4: Application Performance & Enclosure Materials

Table 5: Advantages & Disadvantages of Enclosure Materials

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

Continue to pt. 6 of 6 >>>

Posted in Enclosures, ProductsComments (2)

Six Factors to Consider Prior to Choosing an Electronic Enclosure Pt. 4 of 6


Choosing the right enclosure maybe as important as selecting the right product. An electronic enclosure, also known as housing, helps protect the circuit board allowing it to function properly. Elements (e.g. water, wind, dust, dirt, heat, cold, humidity, and chemicals) in the surrounding environment could damage or deteriorate the product (see Figure 1).

For example, large temperature variations between the inside and outside of the enclosure can result in pressure differences that may create a vacuum and draw water through the fittings or component and gasket seals. Or when moist air reaches its dew point, it can no longer hold its form and forms moisture droplets being formed on any available surfaces. This is called condensation. When temperatures are below freezing, it will condense into frost. After time, corrosion occurs and causes electrical resistance, which in turn generates additional heat, product performance problems, rusting, increasing risk of circuit shorting out, and arcing and sparking incidences.

Here are six factors to think about before choosing an enclosure:

  • Environment
  • Application
  • Thermal management requirements
  • Enclosure performance standards
  • Material
  • Size

————————————————————————————————–

ENCLOSURE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

It is important to understand the enclosure ratings and the level of protection they provide because a single enclosure does not protect against all the elements equally.

To standardize enclosure performance in North America, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL), and Canadian Standards Association (CSA) are the commonly recognized standards organization. To standardize enclosure performance internationally, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) prepares and publishes international standards for all electrical, electronic, and related technologies.

Table 1 describes the NEMA, UL, CSA, and IEC enclosure ratings for both non-hazardous and hazardous locations. For hazardous locations in North America, NEMA has categorized it further and separated it by class, division and groups as seen in Table 2. The class defines the general nature of hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere, the division defines the probability of hazardous material being present in an ignitable concentration in the surrounding atmosphere, and the group defines the hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere. The difference between NEMA and UL is that NEMA does not require a third party testing and leaves compliance completely up to the manufacturer.

Table 1: Enclosure Ratings for Non-Hazardous & Hazardous AreasTable 1: Enclosure Ratings for Non-Hazardous & Hazardous Areas

Table 2: NEMA Classes, Divisions & Groups for Hazardous AreasTable 2: NEMA Classes, Divisions & Groups for Hazardous Areas

Table 3: IEC Enclosure RatingsTable 3: IEC Enclosure Ratings

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

Continue to pt. 5 of 6 >>>

Posted in Enclosures, ProductsComments (8)

Six Factors to Consider Prior to Choosing an Electronic Enclosure Pt. 3 of 6


Choosing the right enclosure maybe as important as selecting the right product. An electronic enclosure, also known as housing, helps protect the circuit board allowing it to function properly. Elements (e.g. water, wind, dust, dirt, heat, cold, humidity, and chemicals) in the surrounding environment could damage or deteriorate the product (see Figure 1).

For example, large temperature variations between the inside and outside of the enclosure can result in pressure differences that may create a vacuum and draw water through the fittings or component and gasket seals. Or when moist air reaches its dew point, it can no longer hold its form and forms moisture droplets being formed on any available surfaces. This is called condensation. When temperatures are below freezing, it will condense into frost. After time, corrosion occurs and causes electrical resistance, which in turn generates additional heat, product performance problems, rusting, increasing risk of circuit shorting out, and arcing and sparking incidences.

Here are six factors to think about before choosing an enclosure:

  • Environment
  • Application
  • Thermal management requirements
  • Enclosure performance standards
  • Material
  • Size

THERMAL MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS
To maximize the efficiency and lifecycle of products, it is important to be able to manage heat buildup. Whether it’s to dissipate or to add heat, effective thermal management is vital.

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

Continue to pt. 4 of 6 >>>

Posted in Enclosures, ProductsComments (4)

Six Factors to Consider Prior to Choosing an Electronic Enclosure Pt. 2 of 6


Choosing the right enclosure maybe as important as selecting the right product. An electronic enclosure, also known as housing, helps protect the circuit board allowing it to function properly. Elements (e.g. water, wind, dust, dirt, heat, cold, humidity, and chemicals) in the surrounding environment could damage or deteriorate the product (see Figure 1).

For example, large temperature variations between the inside and outside of the enclosure can result in pressure differences that may create a vacuum and draw water through the fittings or component and gasket seals. Or when moist air reaches its dew point, it can no longer hold its form and forms moisture droplets being formed on any available surfaces. This is called condensation. When temperatures are below freezing, it will condense into frost. After time, corrosion occurs and causes electrical resistance, which in turn generates additional heat, product performance problems, rusting, increasing risk of circuit shorting out, and arcing and sparking incidences.

Here are six factors to think about before choosing an enclosure:

  • Environment
  • Application
  • Thermal management requirements
  • Enclosure performance standards
  • Material
  • Size

APPLICATION
Application can be associated with market or product. Market applications would be locations such as water treatment plants, parking garages, pools, arenas, repair shops, food plants, etc. Product applications would be physical enclosure requirements such as wall mount, duct mount, easy access, etc.

Written by: Teresa Kouch, Marketing

Continue to pt. 3 of 6 >>>

Posted in Enclosures, ProductsComments (4)

Archives

Gas Detectors

CETCI gas detectors are used to detect many different gases. Some of the most common are Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Nitric Oxide, Ammonia, Chlorine, Ozone, Combustible Gases like Methane and Propane, Oxygen, Refrigerants and more.

IAQ Monitors

The YES Series of IAQ Monitors are essential for those responsible for conducting Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Investigations. These instruments are specifically designed to measure and record the quality of indoor air in offices, buildings, homes, schools, parking garages, ice rinks, etc.